The following changes have been incorporated:

CHANGE
Notes section: P 354 after paragraph: „And, if instead of phoning someone… additional pair of eyes and can point out dangers.“ add reference to F. A. Drews, M. Pasupathi, and D. L. Strayer, “Passenger and Cell Phone Conversations in Simulated Driving,” Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 14 (2008): 392-400. The paper is nicley summarized in Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons, The Invisible Gorilla: And Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us (New York: Crown, 2010), 353–354.

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P 263 start paragraph with: “Above observation is from cognitive psychologists Daniel Simons and Christopher Chabris. At Harvard in the 1990s, they filmed…“

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In the notes section, P 310: “The ‘Nun Bun’ was a cinnamon pastry whose twisty rolls eerily resembled the nose and jowls of Mother Teresa. It was found in a Nashville coffee shop in 1996, but was stolen on Christmas in 2005. ‘Our Lady of the Underpass’ was another appearance by the Virgin Mary, this time in the guise of a salt stain under Interstate 94 in Chicago that drew huge crowds and stopped traffic for months in 2005. Other cases include Hot Chocolate Jesus, Jesus on a shrimp tail dinner, Jesus in a dental x-­ray, and Cheesus (a Cheeto purportedly shaped like Jesus).” Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons, The Invisible Gorilla: And Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us (New York: Crown, 2010), 155

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In the notes section, P 310 use original wording: “… almost immediately after you see an object that looks anything like a face, your brain treats it like a face and processes it differently than other objects.” Reference to ibid page 156.

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P 138, 6th line from the top: In Fooled by Randomness, Taleb recounts how he had dinner with a friend in a bar in New York. „We flipped a coin to see who was going to pay for the meal. I lost and paid. He was about to thank me when he abruptly stopped and said that he paid for half of it probabilistically.” The friend was considering alternative paths.
// Notes section P 331, reference to Fooled by Randomness, p 28

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In the notes section, P 317: “84 percent of Frenchmen …” from Nassim Nicholas Taleb, The Black Swan, P 153. Taleb does not indicate source in text or notes.

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P 93, 12th line from bottom. After the word „Brazil“ add: „Taleb describes this trick in Fooled by Randomness, however, with only 10,000 names.“ // In the notes section on P 327 add the reference „The vignette with the stock market e-mails from Nassim Nicholas Taleb: Fooled by Randomness, P 158.

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P 44, 8th line from the top: after „… single estimates are correct or not.“ Print: „Rather, as Taleb puts it, „it measures the difference between what people actually know and how much they think they know.““

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P 117, 14th line from the bottom: “But not only journalists are underachievers of this skill. We all are, as Nassim Taleb makes clear with the Russion roulette vignette.”

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P 207, 8th line from the bottom: Replace “Taleb traces this tendency back to the neomania pitfall: the mania for all things shiny and new.” with “Taleb, who uses above-mentioned examples of new and old technologies, coined a word for this: neomania, the mania for all things shiny and new.”

These changes were partly initiated by Nassim Taleb.

For a detailed before/after log, including description and discussion, click here. For all errors, inadequacies and omissions I alone bear the responsibility. I thank the authors for bringing these to my attention.